Official Partner The Royal Society of Medicine The Royal Society of Medicine

Menu

Warwick

Warwick Medical School’s accelerated graduate-entry MB ChB programme is a challenging but extremely rewarding programme. It’s designed to help students become highly competent, compassionate and strongly motivated doctors. The four-year programme is the largest graduate-entry course in the UK.

The curriculum is divided into three phases: Phase I covers the scientific basis of medicine and is a year in length; Phase II introduces more complex cases in both primary and secondary care settings and enables students to learn about the expectations of patients and carers in a range of settings; Phase III sees students undertake their elective and further develop their knowledge through a series of specialist blocks.

Course structure:

4 years Integrated, graduate entry only.

Website URL:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/med/
Email:
mbchb.admissions@warwick.ac.uk
Phone:
+44 (0)2476 574 880

Case Study

Name:
Manuj Vyas
Year of Study:
4

What are the best things about your Medical School?

  1. Very fluid, we can make up our own day and direct our own learning.
  2. Early induction into clinical environment and lots of patient contact.
  3. Promotion of working in groups and with colleagues.

What are the hardest things about your course?

  1. It’s an accelerated programme, so students have to learn quite a lot in a short space of time.
  2. Very variable depending on consultants and the team, sometimes one can feel a little lost.
  3. Very difficult exams, but I guess that is what makes us work harder.

What’s the social side of your Medical School like?

Med Soc arranges a variety of social events throughout the year, including nights out, balls and more. Coventry and Leamington are the usual areas for people to hang out.

What tips would you give to someone applying to your Medical School?

  1. Learn how to drive so you can easily get to the hospitals Warwick Medical School is partnered with.
  2. Time management is of key importance, as adult self-directed learning awaits you.
  3. Talk to some medical students and doctors about their experience – it will really help in the interview and help in making up your mind about applying.
Loading

Loading More Content