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MMI Questions

Below is a selection of Multi-Mini Interview, MMI Questions. All MMI Questions describe the station set up and suggest an approach you might take.

The answer guides have been put together by medics who have successfully navigated interviews at top Medical Schools.

Remember, though, that an interview is about an individual, so there are no hard and fast rules. The answer guides are only examples and are not exhaustive. They should be used to stimulate your thinking — not repeated verbatim at your interview.


MMI Questions

MMI Question 1

mmi questions
MMI Questions test your communication skills, empathy and knowledge of ethical scenarios

Station set up:

The interviewer is sitting across from you, on the table there is a wrapped up box. You are asked to instruct the interviewer on how to unwrap and open the box, without helping them or using your hands. It’s not straight forward as the examiner will be using no assumed knowledge and will be doing what you tell them only, e.g. ‘lift up that flap’¦ starts lifting up wrong flap,  ‘Turn the box around’¦ turns box in wrong direction.

This station is testing your communication skills and your patience.

Approach:


MMI Question 2

Station set up:

An actor hands you a card, telling you that, in this role play, you are a close friend of theirs. You have been house-sitting whilst ‘your friend’ has been on holiday and you have to explain to them that you broke their favourite ornament. When informed, the actor becomes hysterical and very angry.

This station is testing your communication skills, ability to give bad news, your empathy and willingness to admit to your mistakes.

Approach:


MMI Question 3

Station set up:

You are told that this weekend you’re going on a camping trip. Before you is a table of random objects. You have 20 seconds to pick 5 objects you deem to be of the most importance and value, and explain.

This station is testing your ability to make time pressured decisions and be able to defend them, it’s also testing your ability to think practically.

Approach:


Practice your interview technique with our MMI Circuit

MMI Question 4

Station set up:

The interviewer asks a question: what ethical principle of medicine would you consider to be most important?

This station is simply testing your knowledge of the various ethical principles and checking that you appreciate their importance when making decisions.

Approach:


MMI Question 5

Station Setup:

You are faced with an actor playing a 65 year old man who has just been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He is coming to his GP for advice on how to cope with his diagnosis as he has heard a lot of stigma over the years about dementia and its burden on both his family and the healthcare service. Whilst talking to you he breaks down into tears.

This station is testing your ability to empathise with patients, knowledge of the problem of an ageing population, communication skills

Approach:


MMI Question 6

Station set-up:

You are told that you are entering a hospital staff room 10 prior to performing surgery with Dr ‘X’. As you enter, you see Dr ‘X’ take a swig of a clear drink from a bottle and quickly close their locker, which you suspect is alcohol. Over the course of the conversation, the Dr beings to forget things and slur their words.

You have 5 minutes to speak to Dr ‘X’.

This station is primarily testing your ability to make value judgments regarding patient safety

One of the big attributes being tested in this station is the ability to approach emotive situations sensitively and sympathetically.

Approach:


MMI Question 7

Station Setup:

On the table there is a diagram which shows the layout of a building. The interviewer asks you to give them directions to get from the entrance of the building to Room A. After you have given your answer, the interviewer asks why you think you are being asked this question.

This station is testing your communication skills and ability to interpret an image.

Approach:


MMI Question 8

Station Setup:

An actor hands you a card which states that you are playing the role of a GP and they are a 16-year-old girl who has come to ask for information about getting tested for STIs but is worried about her parents finding out.

This station is testing your ability to communicate and show empathy as well as your understanding of doctor-patient confidentiality.

Approach:


MMI Question 9

Station Setup:

On the table there is a graph which shows the plasma insulin levels of several patients over the course of one day with the times that meals were consumed indicated. The interviewer asks you to describe the graph for Patient 1. You are then asked to provide an explanation for the changes in insulin levels at different times of the day.

This station is testing your ability to interpret a graph and your scientific knowledge.

Approach:


MMI Question 10

Station Setup:

An actor hands you a card which states that you are playing the role of a surgeon and they are a patient on whom you recently performed a hip replacement. You must inform them that some nerve damage occurred during surgery which means that they may not regain full use of their leg.

This station is testing your communication skills and ability to show empathy.

Approach:


MMI Question 11

Station Setup:

The interviewer tells you that you have 4 minutes to explain the process/purpose of vaccination to them, speaking as you would to any competent adult. When you have finished, they give you another 4 minutes to explain the same thing as if you were speaking to a young child who is about to be vaccinated. This time, you may use a whiteboard and marker to support your explanation if you choose.

This station is testing your communication skills.

Approach:


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