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Medical School Interview: How To Show Teamwork

Don’t know how to talk about teamwork in your Medical School interview? Well, with an increasing number of universities opting for MMI style interviews, many applicants are now being given the chance to show off their teamwork skills through scenarios and role plays.

Traditional style interviews often also do group exercises, so here are some top tips about how to shine in a team activity at your medical school interview:

Teamwork: be polite
Teamwork: be polite

1. Always be polite to your teammates. Never ever be rude.

Always remain polite and courteous, even if there is one really annoying person who keeps dominating the group and even if someone is rude to you. If it helps, take a deep breath if you feel you are starting to get irritated!

 

Teamwork: listen
Teamwork: listen

2. Listen to your teammates. Don’t talk over people.

Even if you think that what the other person is saying is rubbish and that you have a much better idea, wait until they have finished speaking. Then acknowledge their idea, and put forward your own.

Teamwork: include everyone
Teamwork: include everyone

3. Try and include everyone in the group.

If someone hasn’t said anything, ask them if they think the group is going in the right direction. Often they may have a great idea that they haven’t been able to voice yet or they may be the only person to have realised that the group is about to run into difficulty with the task. The task is testing your ability to collaborate – so try not to get too competitive!

Teamwork: don't be shy
Teamwork: don’t be shy

4. Don’t be shy.

If you don’t say anything you cannot be assessed by your interviewers! They will be assessing you on whether you can contribute relevant information to the group. Try to make a significant contribution without completely dominating the group, and try articulate your thoughts coherently. Think about what you are going to say before you say it.

Teamwork: think
Teamwork: think

5. Take a step back.

Always think about whether you and/or the group are addressing the most important and significant aspect of the task – are you are getting bogged down with something which is not all that relevant? Are you getting distracted by conflict within the group?

Teamwork: panel interviews
Teamwork: panel interviews

What about the panel interview?

In a traditional panel interview, the interviewers will likely ask you to tell them about a time that you worked well in a team. It is essential that you have already prepared an example so you are not caught off guard. Always give your best example of  teamwork, as many of you will be able to come up with lots of examples from your school work, extracurricular activities and volunteering. The best examples will have a positive outcome that is verifiable (for example winning a team competition) and where you have made a positive contribution to the team (e.g. by effective delegation or where you were able to compromise and work well with others). It’s always useful to get feedback from someone outside the team about how well you all worked together so that you can also cite this in your answer.

Uploaded by Beth on 8th February 2016

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