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7th December 2020
George Fussey, Director of Career Education at Eton, shares his MMI preparation advice.

Please can you tell us a bit about yourself and your education experience? How long have you been helping students with their Medical School/university applications?

I have worked at Eton for over 35 years and been advising Medical students since I was Head of Biology starting in 1989. Six years ago I took on the role of Director of Career Education and now have responsibility for more general careers advice and guidance but still advise our medics!

How do you advise that students prepare for MMIs?

Normally I would tell them to take note of the following, most of which are cut and pasted from The Medic Portal website!

  • Know what to expect.  Find out everything you can about the MMI process at the Medical School at which you are interviewing.
  • Use your work experience. Lean on the experience logged in your personal portfolio and use specific examples when giving a response.
  • Make sure you understand key ethical concepts relating to medicine, like the 4 pillars and patient confidentiality.
  • Know what it takes to be a good Doctor. Make a list of qualities and practise demonstrating them in your responses.
  • Keep up to date with medical news. Questions may be inspired by stories or debates in the media.
  • Practise giving 6-minute presentations in response to common MMI questions. This will help with time management on the day.

Is there any advice you’re giving them that’s different this year due to the majority of Medical School MMIs taking place online?

Do your practice online and make the most of the excellent training offered by TMP.

How much time do you recommend students allocate to preparing for their MMIs?

I think little and often but never at the last minute (or the night before). Do your research on each Medical School and do make sure you know what is on your personal statement and be prepared to talk about it.

What have you found is the best way to support students in getting ready for MMIs?

Honestly, there is no substitute for practice with medically trained people who can give you sound feedback and help you reflect on your answers.

What do students find most difficult about the Medical School MMIs?

I think it is understanding that some stations will go better than others and that even if one goes less well it is still vital to raise your game for the remaining sessions. We are not always the best judges of our own impact!

Do you have any other advice for teachers helping students through the Medical School application process?

Engage with them early and encourage them to ‘own’ the process themselves rather than relying on others to do it for them. Remember the wise words of Benjamin Franklin: “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”

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